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Poison Darts

January 21, 2011

It was 1926. Everybody in town thought that Harry Potter was abusing his wife. The wife had organised a dinner party for guests in the town. Her lover thought that Harry didn’t know and that he would be out for the evening. He came into the dining room while the 20 guests were eating. They were shocked and embarrassed. Harry said that he could prove that he wasn’t beating his wife, but he would rather inflict pain on the them. He gave several of the guests diseases, and cut others’ throats.

Harry, his wife, and some friends hopped on a train to start a new life. As the train travelled along the tracks I noticed that the technology out window was no longer from the 1920s. It was slowly progressing. I first saw newer telephones, better record players, then later tape players, power tools, and eventually mp3 players and fancy phones.

They arrived at the lake. It must have been Kawaguchiko. I think it was the 1930’s. There were people swimming even though there were alligators in the water. Harry swam across the lake first. Alligators swam after him, but he released a small, dead child from his back-pack as a decoy. There were some boys on the other shore. He knew that they would try to either kill or rob him, so after he swam to shore he grabbed one of the younger ones and held a knife to his neck. Most of Harry’s group made it across the lake without being eaten. The group walked through the bush until they reached an old house (now an art gallery).

One of the boys in Harry’s group thrusted a syringe deep into Harry’s neck. Everybody else blew poison darts which landed in the syringe. The darts contained a disease which meant that he received any affliction that he had dealt that morning, ten fold worse than the original. His eyes popped out of his chest, bruising formed on his face and then burst, and cuts formed all over his body which peeled and contorted.

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